NATIVE DECOLONIZATION

IN THE PACIFIC RIM

Fall 2007 / Winter 2008 program at The Evergreen State College, Olympia, Washington

WINTER 2008 QUARTER

Winter quarter faculty: Zoltán Grossman

 "If you have come to help me, you are wasting your time.

But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together."

- Lila Watson, with other Indigenous Australian activists, Queensland

Link to Fall 2007 quarter syllabus

(Fall quarter faculty: Zoltán Grossman and Frances V. Rains)

Indigenous nation representatives from the United States, Alaska, Canada, Australia and Aotearoa (New Zealand) sign the United League of Indigenous Nations Treaty, Lummi Nation, August 1, 2007.

Description / Faculty Case studies
Rooms / Times Program Covenant
Books Class Schedule / Readings
Assignments Relocated offices [link]

Bookmark this syllabus website (http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/decolonization)
The syllabus is subject to change; website updates supersede the printed syllabus.

Lecture download links are in the Weekly Class Schedule below.


PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

This program examines the dynamics of settler colonization and Native decolonization in a comparative framework, using the Pacific Rim as a geographic focus. By concentrating on a larger region, students will have an opportunity to broaden Indigenous studies beyond the 48 states, and show common processes of Native decolonization in different settler societies.

We will be studying decolonization through cultural revitalization, treaty relationships, and sovereign jurisdiction of First Nations. In this context, the program will explore the qualitative interaction of human beings and the natural environment. In order to examine the central role of Indigenous peoples in the region's cultural and environmental survival, we will use the lenses of geography, history, art and literature.

In the fall quarter, we emphasized the complexities and intricacies of colonization and decolonization by concentrating on a particular region, in this case the First Nations of western Washington and British Columbia.  Aboriginal (indigenous) nations in B.C. did not sign treaties with the Canadian state, and are today in the forefront of defining and mapping their land base.

In the winter quarter, we will expand the focus to appreciate the similarities and differences of Indigenous experiences in other areas of the Pacific Rim. These may include Maori in Aotearoa (New Zealand), Aboriginal peoples in Australia, Ainu in Japan, Pacific island peoples, Tribal Filipinos, Alaskan and Siberian Native peoples, among others. We will be focusing on common Pacific Rim concerns such as climate change, natural resource control, and the impacts of trade, tourism, militarization and cultural domination.

Students will engage the issues through lectures, book seminars, guest speakers, films and field trips. The program will include a range of research and presentation methodologies such as the production of thematic maps (cartography) and other computer graphics. Students will be expected to integrate readings, lecture notes, and other sources in writing assignments.

Total: 16 credits each quarter. Class Standing: Sophomores or above.

Major areas of study include Native American studies, geography and world Indigenous peoples studies.

Prerequisites: Students should have a current, valid passport. At a minimum, students must have a Driver's License and Birth Certificate.

Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in Native studies, geography and global studies.

This program is also listed under Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.

Overnight field trips to Olympic Peninsula (WA) in Fall, and British Columbia (BC) in Winter. Students should have a current, valid passport.


FACULTY

Zoltán Grossman

Office: Lab I Room 3012 Hours: Mon. 3-4; Tel: 867-6153

Office hours: 3:15-4:15 Monday, or by appointment

Mailbox: Lab 1 first floor E-mail: grossmaz@evergreen.edu

Faculty website at http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz


WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 Day Start End General Schedule Sem II Room
MONDAY 10:00 am 12:30 pm Lecture/Film A3109
  1:30 pm 3:00 pm Seminar A3109
WEDNESDAY 10:00 am 12:30 pm Workshop/Guest speaker/Film C3107
THURSDAY 10:00 am 12:30 pm Lecture/Film A3109
  1:30 pm 3:00 pm Seminar A2107


REQUIRED BOOKS (all books and articles are available on reserve at the library)

Raibmon, Paige. (2005). Authentic Indians :Episodes of Encounter from the Late-Nineteenth-Century Northwest Coast. Durham, N.C.: Duke Univ. Press ISBN:0-8223-3547-6. [Also in fall quarter]

Kawagley, Angayuqaq Oscar. (1995) A Yupiaq Worldview: A Pathway to Ecology and Spirit, Second Edition. Long Grove, Ill.: Waveland Press. ISBN: 1-57766-384-5

Alfred, Taiaiake. (2005). Wasáse: Indigenous Pathways of Action and Freedom. Orchard Park, NY:  Broadview Press.ISBN:1-55111-637-5

Roche, Judith, and Meg McHutchison (Eds.) (1998). First Fish, First People: Salmon Tales of the North Pacific Rim. Seattle: U. of Washington Press. ISBN:  0-295-97739-6

Trask, Haunani-Kay (1999) From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawaii. Honolulu :University of Hawaii Press. ISBN: 9780824820596

Gedicks, Al. (2001). Resource Rebels: Native Challenges to Mining & Oil Corporations. Cambridge, MA:  South End Press. ISBN: 0-89608-640-2

Reading, Nigel, and Gary Wyatt (2006) Manawa: Pacific Heartbeat. Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre. ISBN: 0295985704 [OUT-OF-PRINT: Order copies at http://www.campusi.com ]

Durie, Mason (2005) Nga Tai Matatu: Tides of Maori Endurance. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195584686

Sykes, Roberta (1993). Murawina: An Authentic Aboriginal Message. Aptos, Calif.: Smith & Taylor. ISBN:  0-9652539-0-2 [Copies available from Zoltan Grossman]

Smith, Linda Tuhiwai. (1999).  Decolonizing Methodologies: Research & Indigenous Peoples. New York:  Zed Books Ltd. [St. Martin's Press]. ISBN: N-1-85649-624-4

Other articles and chapters will be either handed out, or put online for download.


LINKS OF INTEREST

Evergreen:
 
Evergreen Native Studies Programs:
 
Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies
 
Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute (NIARI)
 
Longhouse Education and Cultural Center
 
Hitéemlkiliiksix: "Within the Circle of the Rim"
 
Reservation-Based, Community
Determined Program
 
Evergreen Library Native resources page

Canada:

Assembly of First Nations
 
B.C. First Nations map
 
Aboriginal Links
 
Union of BC Indian Chiefs
 
First Nations/First Peoples
 
Settlers in Support of Indigenous Sovereignty
 
Aboriginal Youth Network
 
Aboriginal Times
 
Windspeaker
 
Aboriginal Mapping Network

North Pacific:

Pacific Environment

ANSPIRA

Chukotka & Facts

Native Siberian map

Far East peoples

Autonomous republics

Sakhalin II oil/gas

Ainu map

Ainu Culture

Ainu book

Ainu human rights

International Whaling Commission

Hawai'i:

Ka Lahui Hawai'i

Hawaii Nation

Kaho'olawe Island

Hawaiian history archive

Free Hawai'i

Kahea environmental alliance

Federal recognition

State Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA)

Hawaiian Kingdom

U.S. military presence

DMZ Hawaii/Aloha 'Aina

Hawai'i SEED (on GMO Taro)

Virtual Library

Northwest U.S.:

Native nations, publications, research sites
 
Indian Country Today
Indianz.com
NativeWeb
 
WA tribal links
 
Living Like Neighbors
 
North-West Indian News TV
 
Tribal canoe journey
 
Native America Calling
 
National Native News

Pacific Rim Region:

List of Pacific Rim countries
 
United League of Indigenous Nations
 
Climate Change & Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations
 
Pacific Peoples' Partnership
 
Center for World Indigenous Studies & Library
 
Indigenous social profiles
 
Asia-Pacific Network on Climate Change

Nuclear-Free & Independent Pacific

Oceania map

Hitéemlkiliiksix: "Within the Circle of the Rim"

South Pacific:

Oceania map

Pacific Worlds

Polynesia Voyaging Society

Climate Change in Pacific

South Pacific Forum

Nuclear History

Indigenous Movements

Kanaky (background)

Pacific Studies

Tuvalu Faces project

Pacific Islands Report

Pacific Collection (UH)

Philippines:

Tribal Filipinos map

Cordillera Peoples Alliance

Indigenous Rights vs. Globalization

Environment & human rights

Terror in Lumad lands, Mindanao

Languages

Indigenous Peoples' Rights

Indigenous Links

KAMP

Alaska:

Alaska Native map

Languages map

Native Knowledge Network

Alaska Federation of Natives

Native Subsistence

Native Science

ANCSA Resources

Gwich'in

Alaskool

Native Heritage Center

Inter-Tribal Council

Arctic Youth Network

Native Movement Alaska

Sealaska Heritage, Artists

Aotearoa (New Zealand):

New Zealand map

Maori iwi map

Maori population map

Maori Party

Maori TV

Maori University

Ngati Awa

Maori Community

Maori Internet presence

Explore Te Ara

Maori protest history

Treaty of Waitangi

Waitangi Tribunal

Tangata Whenua

Rakiora--the Living North

Sustainable development

Community development

Kaitiakitanga guardianship

Australia:

Australia map

Languages map

Apology to Stolen Generations

Central Land Council

Northern Land Council

Message Stick

Aboriginal communities

Reconciliation

Aboriginal Studies

Natl Indigenous Times

ABC Indigenous

Mabo/Wik Decision

Virtual Library

Aboriginal Rights

The Black GST

Social Statistics

People Against Racism In Aboriginal Homelands

Global Indigenous:

Center for World Indigenous Studies & Library

Fourth World Documentation Archives

Survival International

United Nations Indigenous Forum

UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

U.N. Indigenous Resources

Cultural Survival

Society for Endangered Peoples

Globalization effects on Indigenous Peoples (pdf map)

Native countermapping & GIS links

Perry-Castañeda Map Library (U. of Texas)


ASSIGNMENTS

Cumulative Literature Review (Seminar papers): In order to help facilitate careful and critical reading, each student will compose one full single-space page (~500 words) with review and reflections on the readings from each seminar, due at the beginning of each seminar (beginning the first Thursday). The page should include an abstract, reflections, analysis, questions and/or discussable comments for each seminar's reading. These thoughtful comments will be useful for beginning the seminars. They should be detailed, and refer or respond to specific passages or themes of the reading (not vague, general observations).  These discussion pages will have your name and the seminar date, since they will constitute your attendance in the seminar, and verify that you have completed and reflected on the reading.  Students must always bring the reading itself to the seminar (and any assigned readings to all-program meetings).

Seminar Leadership: Once or twice during the quarter, students will sign up to facilitate the seminar. You can raise questions about the readings, structure the discussion in a way that highlights the main themes of the text, have students work in smaller groups, perhaps create activities, etc. You do not have to lead the discussion at all times, of course, but you should be aware of the process of seminar and take an active role in it. The day before the seminar, you are required to send a current events article to the class that focuses on one the issues or places covered, in order to update the issues and help open discussion.

Mapping project: You will be producing a map as part of your research project. Our two mapping workshops will be held in the Computer Applications Lab (CAL) in Lab 1. You are also welcome to work in the CAL when times are open; the schedule is at http://scicomp.evergreen.edu/cal/cal-schedule The map is an integral part of your research project. A sketch is due with your proposal, a first map draft with your first paper draft, and a final map with the final paper (see dates below).

Field trip: Our two-quarter program has required day trips and overnight field trips to tribal nations in our region. In Winter quarter, we will have a week-long trip to the Coast Salish Gathering (Tulalip Nation) and British Columbia, probably in Weeks 7-8 of Winter quarter. Because U.S. border regulations are changing, students should have a current, valid passport for the January field trip to Canada !!! Get your passport photos and passport now! For information on applying, stop by your Post Office or go to http://travel.state.gov/passport/get/first/first_832.html At a minimum, students must have a Driver's License and Birth Certificate.

Final Project: In winter quarter, students will write a research project paper of 8-10 pages on one of the Case Studies below, framed around one of the four themes of the Indigenous Nations Treaty: (1.) Trade, (2.) Cultural properties protection, (3.) Border-crossing, and (4.) Climate change. You will select a Case Study at the end of Week 1. At the end of Week 2, you will submit a Proposal of one page that will describe your case study, provide a list of topics to be covered in your paper, and offer 5 sources (at least 2 of them not on the web). The papers should make use of graphics, especially maps, that have been cited with their source or weblink (but graphics will not count in the 8-10 page length). Your research should include e-mail contact with an indigenous source (or someone deeply involved in indigenous issues) in your case study region; find a soyrce early in your project.

On the due date for the First Draft and Final Paper (below) you will bring the assignment stapled, 12 point double-spaced. The seminar faculty member will return the first draft marked with comments. Please take care in your writing; try to write a quality paper that you could publish in a journal. This means treating your readers with respect by drafting, organizing, revising, and proofreading your research paper. It should be presented with appropriate grammar, sentence structure, title, page numbers, and a full bibliography of all your sources (after the 8-10 page paper).. All your research should be original, and sources of all quotes and ideas must be cited in the text with either footnotes or parentheses (Xxxx, p. y). Copying and pasting text from a website, or lazily passing off anyone else's writing as your own constitutes PLAGIARISM and will be dealt with with zero credit for the project and/or the program. See Evergreen Library's APA Citation & Style Guide page.

Final Presentation to Class Symposium: During week 10, you will present your research as part of a class symposium. You will be evaluated not only on your paper, but on how you summarize it in your 15-20 minute lecture (do not simply read your paper out loud!). Use graphics and maps, and add 10 minutes for questions to show your knowledge of the case study. The use of powerpoint is encouraged; Each graphic, quote and fact should be cited with a direct link to its source or webpage of origin. It will be especially valuable to compare the past and present experiences of different indigenous nations, to show how they are both similar and different.

PROJECT DUE DATES
Select case study Thurs., Jan. 10
Proposal Thurs., Jan. 17
First Draft Thurs., Feb. 14
Final Paper Wed., March 12 (10:00 am)
Final Presentations March 12-13


CASE STUDIES
Alaska (U.S.) Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Siberia (Russia) Australia
Hokkaido (Japan) Micronesian nations
Hawai'i (U.S.) Other Polynesian nations
The Philippines Other Melanesian nations


PROGRAM COVENANT

As we engage in the collective work of this program, please bear in mind that we form an academic community. In order to study and learn effectively as individuals, we need to work together as a group.

Evergreen's Social Contract: The Social Contract includes provisions on freedom, civility, rights, prohibition against discrimination, intellectual honesty, and other topics. If you are not familiar with the social contract, find it on line at http://www.evergreen.edu/about/social.htm. The Social Contract governs all members of the Evergreen community.

Learning in the midst of conflict: It is important that we speak openly about our needs and concerns and that we respect the needs and concerns of others. As we work through the program we expect to encounter differences, and if conflict arises, we agree to proceed with respect. If we critique an idea or position, we agree to offer constructive criticism, including the posing of possible alternatives.

Learning about cultural difference and social inequality: Our program's inquiry requires an open-mindedness towards ideas and values which might be different from our own and a willingness to learn about serious issues such as the history of racism, ethnocentrism, cultural prejudice, sexism, classism and other forms of oppression. These and other structures of inequality shape the experiences of all people living in the historical and contemporary world, including all of us, as the experiences we bring to the classroom. Our program work involves academic study and promotion of a cooperative and supportive atmosphere for all program members to work on these issues. We will respect and value differences of belief, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, class background, age, and experience. We will not generalize about all individuals in social groups, or assume that they represent unchanging and monolithic blocs.

Credit and Attendance: Full credit can be earned by doing all of the following:

o Reading assigned texts in advance of seminar, and bringing the readings to seminar.

o Participating in seminars and all-program activities (such as lectures,workshops, film discussions, and field trips. Participation is defined as active listening, speaking, and thinking. Some powerpoint lectures can be downloaded and printed in advance from links in the Weekly Class Schedule (below), to aid in note-taking.

o Attending seminars and all-program activities (as attendance is a precondition of participation, absences will diminish your ability to earn full credit; more than three absences will mean reduced credit; three occasions of tardiness will equal one absence). ABSENCES WILL ONLY BE EXCUSED UNDER EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES. (documented in an e-mail or phone message, preferably in advance). A pattern of late arrival to class can also lead to reduced credit, as can handing in work after it is due, since both are unfair to the students and faculty who are keeping the program running on schedule.

o Completing all assignments by the date due.

o Writing a narrative self-evaluation for your transcript.

o Attending an evaluation conference when you leave the program.

o If you do all the above at a passing level, you will earn 16 credits for the quarter.

The quality of the work you accomplish will be described in a narrative evaluation.

Engagement: Evergreen programs are not simply a collection of classes, but a deeper effort to form a learning community. We learn from each other, and are therefore responsible to each other to participate in the learning community. Participation is defined as active listening, speaking, and thinking. Communication and attendance are vital to build relationships among students, and between students and faculty. In the interest of fairness, we want all students to have equal access to all information, and to have their attendance count. The program e-mail lists are a critical part of staying informed about any changes to the syllabus, and any current events that relate to the program. If you do not use your @evergreen.edu address, you are required to forward e-mails to your preferred address. You should check your e-mail every weekday for any updates, and you are encouraged to pass along interesting news items that relate to the program. Any e-mails or material sent to faculty should be sent from your @evergreen.edu address to avoid email interface problems (hotmail, yahoo, gmail and other accounts are notorious for not working well with listserves, so users are missing critical information).

All-program Attendance: Attending seminars and all-program activities is the other critical aspect of participating in the learning community. As Woody Allen once said: "80 percent of life is just showing up." Many students make great efforts to coordinate their transportation, jobs and family in order to attend class. In fairness to students who attend, there will be a sign-in sheet at all-program lectures, films, workshops, etc. for students to initial. Since attendance is a precondition of participation, absences will diminish your ability to earn full credit; more than three absences will likely lead to reduced credit. BE ON TIME FOR THIS CLASS; it is in your own interest to be on time since class instructions are usually at the beginning. Three occasions of tardiness will equal one absence. Absences will only be excused under extenuating circumstances (documented in an e-mail or phone message to your seminar's faculty member, preferably in advance). Always keep in communication with your seminar's faculty member.

Note-taking is strongly encouraged to retain information for discussion and assignments. Some powerpoints and other lectures can be downloaded and printed from links on the web to aid in note-taking. You should identify a friend who can take detailed notes in case of your excused absence.

Cooperative efforts. All-program work (and seminars) require collaborative and cooperative efforts from both faculty and students. Students should familiarize themselves with the Program Covenant, the Evergreen Social Contract and the Student Conduct Code regarding issues such as plagiarism and disruptive behavior. Normal adult behavior, of course, is expected, and disruptive or disrespectful behavior will be grounds for being asked to leave the program.  In all program activities, please make sure your cell phones are turned off, and you do not make it difficult for students or faculty to listen or concentrate. Laptops are not to be used at all during this program, in order that students participate in listening and discussing. (It is no problem to use laptops during breaks.)

Seminar Attendance: Significant parts of the program are organized as a seminar. Consistent attendance and informed discussion is not only encouraged and desired but also expected. The subject matter is complex; the program, however, is structured in such a manner that the foundations for each class are established in the preceding classes. The seminar is essentially a Book and Text seminar (movies are part of the texts); therefore each student should bring the day's reading material to the class. It is important that the seminar discussion stay on topic with the text as the main source of the discussion. Seminar attendance, preparation, and participation is also considered very important to your individual success, as well as to the collective success of the group. The faculty anticipate lively and respectful discussion. The seminar will be a collaborative, exploratory undertaking and is the place where most of the insights will be made. We are looking forward to engaged and vital seminar groups.

Evaluation: Your evaluation will consist of your seminar leader's written evaluation of your work, your self-evaluation, and the evaluation conference. Students will submit a final, typed, formal evaluation of their seminar leader at the end of each quarter. Students will submit a final, typed, formal self-evaluation at the evaluation conference.You will be evaluated on your level of comprehension of the material, on your skills (writing, thinking, speaking, listening, research, presentation), and on your intellectual engagement with the major themes of the program as reflected in assignments and seminar discussions.

Evaluation of student performance: Credit is not the same as positive evaluation. Students earn credit for fulfilling minimum requirements and standards. The evaluation is a statement describing the quality of the student's work. It is possible for a student to receive credit but receive an evaluation that describes poor quality work. It is also possible for a student to attend regularly yet receive no or reduced credit because of unsatisfactory performance. Starting early on readings and projects, and even staying somewhat ahead of the program schedule, can help prevent last-minute crisis completions of projects, and enhance your participation in seminar discussions. A paper handed in late may not be accepted for credit if the faculty member does not accept your circumstances as extenuating.

Evaluation Conferences: Each student will have an evaluation conference with his/her seminar leader at the end of the quarter to discuss the student's self-evaluation, the faculty evaluation of the student, and the student evaluation of the faculty. Students should not make plans for vacation without first signing up for an evaluation conference with their seminar leaders. Students who wish to have the student evaluation process separated from the faculty evaluation process may submit a written evaluation of the faculty member to the program secretary.

Grievance Procedures: It is important to act on grievances in a timely fashion. The most direct way is to pursue the matter through these steps:

1. Take up the concern with the parties involved in the grievance.

2. If not resolved, meet with seminar leader.

3. If still not resolved, meet with the faculty team.

4. If still not resolved, meet with the academic dean.

However, in some situations and particularly in difficult situations students may feel uncomfortable with face to face encounters. In such cases, the college offers a range of support services. Among these are the Grievance Office (x6891), Access Services (x6348, TTY 360-867-6834), Counseling Center (x6800), First People's Advising (x6467), Housing (x6132), and Sexual Assault Prevention Office (x5221). The Grievance Office can refer you to additional support services.

Academic Honesty: In an academic community we learn from each other. It is important that you acknowledge other people for their ideas, and never pass off someone else's ideas as your own. In written work, always use proper citations. You must not simply copy information without citation, or even rely on cited web data without using library or other media sources. See the Social Contract for more information about plagiarism. Copying and pasting text from a website, or lazily passing off anyone else's writing as your own constitutes PLAGIARISM and will be dealt with with zero credit for the project and/or the program.

Students may be asked to leave the program. If a student repeatedly disrupts the attempts of others to learn, faculty team members will warn the student that continuation of this behavior will result in his or her dismissal from the program. If the behavior continues, the faculty team will confer and will ask the person to leave the program at once.

Alcohol/Drugs. Any use of alcohol or drugs at a program event will be grounds for immediate dismissal from the program.

Accommodations: Please let your faculty know at the beginning of the quarter if there are any reasonable accommodations that you will need that will be coordinated through the Evergreen's Access Services.

The faculty members have agreed to this covenant by the act of writing it and continuing in the program. Each student recognizes that this covenant expresses the ground rules governing the program and agrees to abide by it by the act of continuing in the program and by signing and dating the Seminar Introduction Form (attached to printyed syllabus) and returning it to their seminar leader.


WEEKLY CLASS SCHEDULE

WEEK ONE: JAN. 7-10 ( Northwest / Alaska)

Readings: Raibmon, Paige. (2005). Authentic Indians: Episodes of Encounter from the Late-Nineteenth-Century Northwest Coast.

Kawagley, Angayuqaq Oscar. (1995). A Yupiaq Worldview: A Pathway to Ecology and Spirit.

Monday Jan. 7, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Introduction to winter quarter

Guest speaker: Jewell James (Lummi Nation policy advisor and master carver)

Guest speaker: Alan Parker (Chippewa-Cree), Director of Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute; inspiration for United League of Indigenous Nations

Film: Establishing a United League of Indigenous Nations

Mon. seminar 1:30-3:00 pm READ: Raibmon (ENTIRE BOOK)
Wednesday Jan. 9, 10:00 am-12:30 pm Guest speaker: Laura Grabhorn (Tlingit-Haida assistant director of Longhouse)
Thursday Jan. 10, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Alaska Overview I

Film: Kuwóot yas.éin (His Spirit is Looking Out From the Cave)

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Kawagley (ENTIRE BOOK)

Film: They Never Asked Our Fathers

SELECT RESEARCH PROJECT CASE STUDY


WEEK TWO: JAN. 14-17 (Canada / Alaska / Russia)

Readings: Alfred, Taiaiake. (2005). Wasáse: Indigenous Pathways of Action and Freedom.

Roche, Judith, and Meg McHutchison (Eds.) (1998). First Fish, First People: Salmon Tales of the North Pacific Rim

Monday Jan. 14, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Alaska Overview II

Climate change in Alaska (Abraham, Sakakibara, etc.)

Films: Oil on Ice, Native thoughts on climate change, Losing Ground

READ: Roche (pp. 100-21)

Mon. seminar 1:30-3:00 pm READ: Alfred (pp. 19-100)
Wednesday Jan. 16 10:00 am-12:30 pm Mapping Workshop I, Computer Applications Lab (CAL), Lab 1
Thursday Jan. 17, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Autonomous regions and environment of Russia

Chukotka images, Small Peoples of the North, Sakhalin, Dersu Uzala

READ: Roche (pp. 91-99, 150-59)

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Alfred (pp. 126-175, 204-36, 257-82)

RESEARCH PROJECT PROPOSAL DUE


WEEK THREE: JAN. 23-24 (Japan / Hawai'i)

Readings: Roche, Judith, and Meg McHutchison (Eds.) (1998). First Fish, First People: Salmon Tales of the North Pacific Rim

Trask, Haunani-Kay (1999) From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawaii.

Dougherty, Michael (1992). To Steal a Kingdom: Probing Hawaiian History, pp. 165-84 [handout]

Wednesday Jan. 23, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Guest speaker: Kitty (Chisato) Dubreuil (Ainu co-author of Ainu: Spirit of a Northern People)

READ: "The Ainu and Their Culture: A Critical 21st Century Assessment" (Japan Focus)

READ: "Ainu-e" (Instructional Resources for the Study of Japan's Other People) [handout]

READ: Roche (pp. 22-45, 58-63, 122-31, 196-99)

Thursday Jan. 24, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Hawai'i overview I

Film: Act of War: the Overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Trask (Introduction, Parts I and II)

Dougherty handout


WEEK FOUR: JAN. 28-31 (Hawai'i / Pacific Islands / Climate Change)

Readings: Trask, Haunani-Kay (1999) From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawaii.

LaDuke, Winona. (1999). All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life, pp. 166-82 [handout]

Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute (2006). Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Peoples: http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/IndigClimate2.pdf [handout]

Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute (2007). Native Peoples: The 'Miner's Canary' of Climate Change http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/CLIMATECHANGE.FINAL.pdf [handout]

Monday, Jan. 28, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Hawai'i overview II

Films: Storytellers of the Pacific, GMO Taro, Strykers

Other films: The Hawaiians: Reflecting Spirit or The Tribunal

Mon. seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Trask (Parts III and IV, Appendixes)

READ: LaDuke handout; Trask 1st edition handout (on coalitions)

Workshop: Pele and geothermal development

Wednesday Jan. 30, 10:30 am-12:00 pm

NOTE ROOM CHANGE

FOCUS THE NATION: Creating a Climate of Change.

A 2-page Reflections Paper covering all three sections will be due Thursday in class. Begins at 8:45 am in the CRC. You are required to attend at 10:30 am-12:00 pm for the Climate Change in the Northwest forum with Tulalip Tribes Natural Resources Director Terry Williams, Shelly Vendiola, and others. You can also attend (optional) a 1:15-2:40 workshop on Local Solutions, and the 3:00-5:00 pm Community Activism panels/workshop in the Longhouse.

Thursday Jan. 31, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

NOTE ROOM CHANGE

IN THE LONGHOUSE:

Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations (Z)

Guest speaker: Michele "Shelly" Vendiola (Swinomish/Lummi/Filipina; Community Alliance for Peacemaking Project, Seattle)

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

IN OUR REGULAR SEMINAR ROOM A2107

READ: Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute climate change handouts

Film: Rising Waters

Thursday 3:00-5:00 pm (optional)

LECTURE HALL 4

Guest speakers: Tamra Gilbertson & Kevin Smith of the Durban Group for Climate Justice present on Carbon Trading (who wins and who loses), off-sets, and false solutions.


WEEK FIVE: FEB. 4-7 (The Philippines / Natural Resources)

Readings: Gedicks, Al. (2001). Resource Rebels: Native Challenges to Mining and Oil Corporations.

Monday Feb. 4, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Facing West: Manifest Destiny and Overseas Imperialism

Film: Savage Acts; Wars, Fairs and Empire

Guest speaker: Gillian Hewitson (Feminist Economics faculty candidate) on "The Reproductive Work of Empire: Australia's Stolen Generations" 12:00-1:00 pm, C1107

Mon. seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Gedicks, Foreword and pp. 1-66

Colombia, Ecuador , Swinomish (March Point) videos

Wednesday Feb. 6 10:00 am-2:00 pm

NOTE ROOM CHANGE

10:00 am IN SEM II E1105:

Guest Speaker Leah Henry-Tanner (Nez Perce), Coordinator of United Indians of All Tribes Foundation's Native American Women's Dialogue on Infant Mortality

12 noon-2:00 pm: Mapping Workshop II (CAL), Lab 1

Thursday Feb. 7, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Philippine environmental alliances

Grossman, Zoltan. (1986). "Inside the Philippine Revolution" (Race & Class)

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Gedicks, pp. 67-122, 181-99

Papua New Guinea, Bougainville, West Papua videos

Friday, Feb. 8 DAY OF ABSENCE


WEEK SIX: FEB. 11-16 (Pacific Islands / Aotearoa / Climate Change Summit)

Readings: Reading, Nigel , and Gary Wyatt (2006) Manawa: Pacific Heartbeat.

Monday Feb. 11, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Film: Return to the Swing on the Longhouse exhibit Hitéemlkiliiksix: "Within the Circle of the Rim" (2001)

Guest speaker: Lara M. Evans (Evergreen faculty in art history)

Mon. seminar 1:30-3:00 pm READ: Manawa, pp. 1-82
Wednesday Feb. 13

DAY OF PRESENCE

A 2-page Reflections Paper covering at least two workshops will be due by Friday 4:00 pm via e-mail.

Thursday Feb. 14, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Pacific Islands Overview: Nuclear and Military Presence

Films: Radio Bikini, Guam

FIRST DRAFT OF RESEARCH PROJECT DUE

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Manawa, pp. 83-170

Film: Maori flag

Saturday, Feb. 16, 11:00 am-6:00 pm

NORTHWEST CLIMATE CHANGE SUMMIT: Indigenous Healing Solutions

Seattle University Student Center 160, 11:00 am-6:00 pm (Download Flyer)

Billy Frank Jr. (Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission), Tom Goldtooth (Indigenous Environmental Network), James Rasmussen (Duwamish), Leon Rattler (Blackfeet), Katherine Gottlieb (Aleut), Native Youth PhotoVoice Project, Haida Heritage Dancers, Kanim/Enick Klan Singers, Angaangaq - Eskimo/Kalaallit, Longhouse Media/Native Lens Youth

Carbon Trading Roundtable, Seattle University Wycoff Auditorium, 7:00-9:00 pm

(Also Feb. 16-17: Sa-Heh-Wa-Mish Days Powwow at Little Creek Casino in Kamilche: Events)


WEEK SEVEN: FEB. 20-21 Aotearoa (New Zealand)

Readings: Durie, Mason (2005) Nga Tai Matatu: Tides of Maori Endurance. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.

Wednesday Feb. 20, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Maori Nations I

Film: Utu (Maori history)

Thursday Feb. 21, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Film: Whale Rider

Hawai'ian and Muckleshoot language immersion schools

Film: Storytellers of the Pacific

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Durie, Chapters 1-5

Films: Waitangi, Ora, Tame Iti


WEEK EIGHT: FEB. 25-MARCH 2 (Aotearoa / Australia / FIELD TRIP)

Readings: Durie, Mason (2005) Nga Tai Matatu: Tides of Maori Endurance. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.

Monday Feb. 25 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Maori Nations II

Film: Once Were Warriors

Mon. seminar 1:30-3:00 pm

READ: Durie, Chapters 6-10

Film: N.Z. police raids 1 2 3 4 (Oct. 2007)

Tuesday Feb. 26, 4:00 pm

Film: Mabo: Life of an Island Man, Library 1501, 4:00 pm.

Leave for Tulalip at 5:30 pm from Parking Lot C.

Wednesday Feb. 27

COAST SALISH GATHERING, hosted by Tulalip Tribes (Marysville), Day 1

Speakers: Chairman Mel Sheldon (Tulalip Tribes), Kenny Moses (Tulalip), Bernie Gobin (Tulalip), Chet Chayou (Swinomish), Tom Sampson (Saanich Inlet First Nation), Chief Shawn Atleo (Ahousaht First Nation and BC Regional Chiefs), and many others. Cultural performances.

Thursday Feb. 28

COAST SALISH GATHERING, Day 2

Speakers: Chairman Brian Cladoosby (Swinomish), Chairman Jim Peters (Squaxin Island), Randy Kinley (Lummi), Andy Thomas (Equimalt First Nation), Chief Darren Blaney (Homalco First Nation), Elin Miller (EPA regional administrator), Paul Kluckner (Environment Canada regional director general), Randall Lewis (Squamish), and many others.

Keynote by Billy Frank, Jr. (Nisqually, NWIFC director); recognition of other Boldt Decision warriors.

Friday Feb. 29

COAST SALISH GATHERING, Day 3 Indian Country Today article

Speakers: First Nations Summit Grand Chief Ed John (Carrier Sekani First Nation), Chief Leah George (Tsleil-Waututh First Nation), Chief Lydia Hwitsum (Cowichan First Nation), Women Witness sharing, and others.

Honoring of the North American Indigenous Games (Cowichan First Nation BC, Aug. 3-10, 2008)

Arrive in Vancouver; stay at HI Downtown Hostel

 Saturday, March 1

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (UBC) House of Learning

Guest speaker: UBC Adjunct Prof. Larry Grant on issues in his Musqueam First Nation, and Pacific Peoples Partnership climate change exchanges to Cook Islands.

UBC Museum of Anthropology tour; attending Welcoming Stone T'xwelatse: First Ancestor of the Ts'elxwéyeqw People (repatriation of ancestor stone from Burke Museum, originally stolen from B.C. band in 1892 ).

Speakers: Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point (Queen's representative to B.C.), T'xwelátse / Herb Joe (former Chief of Tzeachten First Nation), Sonny McHalsie (Co-Director, Stó:lo Research & Resource Management Centre), Musqueam elder Larry Grant, and others.

GREEN LIVING CONFERENCE, B.C. Place

Speaker: Sheila Watt-Cloutier (former chair of Inuit Circumpolar Conference; 2007 Nobel Peace Prize nominee for her climate change activism).

 Sunday, March 2

BOAT TOUR of Stó:lo cultural sites on Harrison Lake and River by Sasquatch Tours (Harrison Hot Springs, BC).

Tour guide: Chief Willie Charlie of the Chehalis Indian Band, B.C.


WEEK NINE: MARCH 3-6 (FIELD TRIP / Australia)

Readings: Sykes, Roberta (1993). Murawina: An Authentic Aboriginal Message. 

Monday Mar. 3

VANCOUVER ART GALLERIES in the Gastown District

Speaker: Nigel Reading tour of Spirit Wrestler Gallery; Co-curator / Author of Manawa: Pacific Heartbeat: A Celebration of Contemporary Maori and Pacific Northwest Coast Art.

Return to Olympia

Wednesday, March 5

Discussion of field trip

Film: Rabbit-Proof Fence

Thursday Mar. 6, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Film: The Black GST

Australia Overview: from Massacres to Mining

Films: Apology to the Stolen Generations (Feb. 13, 2008)

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm READ: Sykes, pp. 1-185


WEEK TEN: MARCH 10-13 (Student Research Presentations)

Readings: Smith, Linda. (1999).  Decolonizing Methodologies: Research & Indigenous Peoples.

Monday Mar. 10, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Guest speaker: Tina Kuckkahn (Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe), Director of Evergreen's Longhouse Education and Cultural Center

Relations between Left and Indigenous Movements (Z)

READ: Grossman, "Inside the Philippine Revolution" (Race & Class) sections on Cordillera and Mindanao.

Mon. seminar 1:30-3:00 pm READ: Smith, Introduction, Parts 1-5
Wednesday Mar. 12, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

FINAL RESEARCH PAPER DUE AT 10:00 am

STUDENT RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS

READ: United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Thursday Mar. 13, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

STUDENT RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS

READ: Smith, Parts 5-10

Film: Tahi (Pacific indigenous struggles)

Thursday seminar 1:30-3:00 pm CLASS POTLUCK and fall/winter program summative discussion (bring a dish to share)


EVALUATIONS WEEK: MAR. 17-19

Students should not make plans for spring break without first signing up for an evaluation conference with their seminar leaders. Bring a copy of your self-eval and faculty eval to your (required) evaluation conference. See the PROGRAM COVENANT (above)



CLASS FIELD TRIP TO COAST SALISH TERRITORIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

 

Class at University of British Columbia House of Learning with UBC Adjunct Prof. Larry Grant on issues in his Musqueam First Nation, and Pacific Peoples Partnership climate change exchanges to Cook Islands.

 

Welcoming Stone T'xwelatse: First Ancestor of the Ts'elxwéyeqw People repatriation ceremony at UBC Museum of Anthropology

 

Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point (the Queen's representative to B.C.) welcoming the repatriation of the ancestor stone from the Burke Museum. He is the province's first Aboriginal Lieutenant-Governor.

 

T'xwelátse or Herb Joe (former Chief of Tzeachten First Nation) explaining how his namesake ancestor stone was originally stolen from his nation in 1892 , and how it was located at the Burke Museum a century later and finally returned.

 

Boat tour of Stó:lo cultural sites on Harrison Lake and River by Sasquatch Tours (Harrison Hot Springs, BC), led by Chief Willie Charlie of the Chehalis Indian Band

 

Program faculty Zoltán Grossman with buddy in Harrison Hot Springs, B.C.

 

Tour of the Spirit Wrestler Gallery by Nigel Reading, exhibit co-curator / author of our class reading Manawa: Pacific Heartbeat: A Celebration of Contemporary Maori and Pacific Northwest Coast Art.

 

Some cool rock band shooting its next album cover in back of the UBC Museum of Anthropology.

 

Return to Evergreen Home Page

Made by: Zoltán Grossman

grossmaz@evergreen.edu

Last modified: 3/14/2008