Welcome to the 2014-2015 homepage of Earth Dynamics at The Evergreen State College. This interdisciplinary program will study how humans have changed Earth's climate, how climate changes (natural and anthropogenic) have affected (and are affecting) us, and how humans have evolved, and are currently responding.

 

PREREQUISITES: Facility with high school algebra. Good reading skills and decent writing skills. Ability and willingness to use computers and internet daily for assignments and information. Willingness to work in teams.

 

WINTER Prerequisites: Read over winter break: IPCC Synthesis Report / Collapse, by Diamond:  *Introduction, *Part 1, *Ch.4 & 5  / Why We Disagree About Climate Change, by Hulme:  *Introduction, *Ch.1, *Ch.2   / Global Warming Reader, ed. McKibben:  *Introduction, *Part I: Science.

In week 1, you will join a Research Team started in fall quarter (Solar, wind, water, sustainable waste disposal, communication, etc.) We recommend that new winter students meet faculty at Academic Fair in December.

The first day of WINTER class is at 1:00 on Monday 5 Jan. at 1:00 in SEM 2 B1105. Waitlisted students must attend the first class to get in. Registered students who miss (or are very late to) the first day (or who don't attend later in the week) may be dropped from the program, in order to admit waitlisted students who are attending.

 

Winter SCHEDULE: Most of our classes are in the SEM 2 building.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Fri-Sun

 

 

9:00-12:00 in B1107 sometimes
Activities vary - we won't meet every week

 

reading
writing
thinking
meeting
doing
online work
11:30-12:30
Team Meetings
some Mondays 12:30 in COM 107 B2105, 2107, 2109   B2105, 2107, 2109
1:00-3:00
Class in B1105
1:00-3:00
Seminar
1:00-3:00
Governance
1:00-3:00
Seminar
3:00-5:00
Governance
3:30-5:30
Class in B1105
3:00-5:00
Governance
3:30-5:30
Class in B1105
R&R

 

 

WINTER TEXTS are available in the Greener Store. You are welcome to use e-books when available, provided you take careful notes as usual (e.g. with an e-reader that permits markup). Always bring your assigned texts (or e-texts) to class.  We will refer to them in discussions, and it’s essential to have readings with you in hand. Short additional readings may be provided in class and online.

IPCCAR5

Nye

collapse

GWreader

hulme

lieberman

Hulme, Why We Disagree About Climate Change, (2009, Cambridge University Press). A remarkably thoughtful, clear, and subtle discussion of belief, science, and communication.

Diamond, Collapse: How Societies Choose to Succeed or Fail, (2005 Viking - 2013 Penguin). We will read select chapters of this classic work.

McKibben (ed.), The Global Warming Reader: A century of writing about climate change, (2012, Penguin). A widely respected environmental writer brings together essential voices on global warming, from its 19th-century discovery to the present, from discovery to impacts and action.

Guterl, The Fate of the Species: Why the human race may cause its own extinction and How we can stop it, (2012, Bloomsbury)

Nye, Technology Matters: Questions to Live With, (2007, MIT Press)

Lieberman, The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health, and Disease, (2013, Knopf Doubleday)

selections from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), 2014
Note to readers who benefit from listening to texts: TESC Access Services may be able to provide free audio books for qualified students. AudioBook Audio books are often available at reduced prices if you buy Kindle editions online.

Faculty Contacts: Office hours - after class, in our classroom, or by appointment.
360-867-6383
koppelmn(at)evergreen.edu
Prof. Nancy Koppelman, Ph.D., American Studies Lab 2 Rm 2255
zita(at)evergreen.edu Prof. E.J. Zita, Ph.D., Physics Lab 2 Rm 2272
deuala24(at)evergreen.edu Alan Deufel Program Teaching Assistant (TA)
360-867-5608
bretw(at)evergreen.edu
Prof. Bret Weinstein, Ph.D., Biology Lab 2 Rm 2269

 

Please check Answers to FAQs before emailing. Thank you.

FAQs: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: There's a waitlist for this program. How can I get in? A: First, make sure you have the prerequisites for this program. Get your texts for the first week, do the reading, and come prepared and on time to the first class(es). Let us know when we take roll!

Q: Why can't I access Moodle from the link here? A: Registered students will have full access to our Moodle site in week 1 of the quarter. If you are registered for our program and have completed our week 1 workshop, and still cannot access Moodle, please contact faculty, the TA, or Computer Services.

Q: How are things different in Winter quarter? A: We will have a Guest Lecture Series, and Earth Dynamics will join Evolution and the Human Condition and Between Land and Sea to learn about human evolution from Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying. Their public lecture series, which is open to the campus community, will be connected with our study of Daniel Lieberman’s new book The Story of the Human Body (2014), which Bret and Heather’s program is also reading.

Q: What should I read over winter break? A: New students must read the chapters that we read in fall, in texts which we are continuing to use in winter. Students who would like to read ahead can check out this draft reading list

Q. Where are details of that Guest Lecture Series for winter quarter? A: At the Guest Lecture Series link, coming soon - and at Academic Fair. Come meet faculty there for more information.

Q. How can I find out what Research Projects I can join in winter quarter? A: Stay tuned for a Research Projects link, or come talk with us at Academic Fair.

Q. Where is the special Fall information? A: See the program description for official stuff and our Welcome Letter for practical details about Fall quarter.

Fall SCHEDULE: All of our classes are in the SEM 2 building.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Fri-Sun

 

 

9:00-12:00
Writing Workshop
Sem2 B1107

 

reading
writing
thinking
meeting
doing
online work
11:30-12:30
Team Meetings
  B2105, 2107, 2109   B2105, 2107, 2109
1:00-3:00
Class in B1105
1:00-3:00
Seminar
1:00-3:00
Governance
1:00-3:00
Seminar
3:00-5:00
Governance
3:30-5:30
Class in B1105
3:00-5:00
Governance
3:30-5:30
Class in B1105
R&R

FALL TEXTS

kolbert

rip

Meditations

collapse

ruddiman

menand

hulme

GWreader

The Sixth Extinction: An unnatural history, by Elizabeth Kolbert (2014, Holt, Macmillan) From the discovery of evolution to impacts of climate change, these true science stories are beautifully written by a renowned natural historian.

Rip Van Winkle, by Washington Irving. You can listen to and read this story online.  First published in 1820, “Rip Van Winkle” is written in prose that can strike the modern ear as archaic.  Yet the problem of perspective that the story raises is perpetual, and we will return to it.  We recommend that you listen and read at the same time, for better understanding. 

Discourse on Methods and Meditations on First Philosophy, 4th Ed. by Rene Descartes, trans. Donald A. Cress (1999, Hackett Classics)

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Succeed or Fail (not Guns, Germs, and Steel) by Jared Diamond

Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum: How humans took control of climate, by William Ruddiman (2005, Princeton Science Library). From the invention/discovery of fire to agriculture and the domestication of livestock, humans have made climate impacts for millenia.

The Metaphysical Club:  A Story of Ideas in America, by Louis Menand (2001, Farrar, Straus and Giroux). A riveting, original book about the creation of modern American thought. Winner of the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for History. (Also to be used in winter quarter.)

Why We Disagree About Climate Change, by Michael Hulme (2009, Cambridge University Press). A very thoughtful and clear discussion of subtleties of belief, science, and communication. (Also to be used in winter quarter.)

The Global Warming Reader: A century of writing about climate change, edited by Bill McKibben (2012, Penguin). A widely respected environmental writer brings together essential voices on global warming, from its 19th-century discovery to the present. (Also to be used in winter quarter.)

selections from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), 2013

 


FALL FEE: $200 field trips.
Plan to be out of town on a field trip Mon.-Thus. 13-16 Oct. 2014, week 3 of fall quarter.