EVERGREEN: At the Interface of Art and Science

the project | tom rye harvill | faculty & staff | gallery

 

This award is open to faculty, staff, and alumni of The Evergreen State College. The interrelationship of art and science has produced objects and ideas of enduring meaning and beauty: Gray's Anatomy, British Admiralty charts of the 18th and 19th centuries, the exciting mix of natural history, art, society and science accompanying the Enlightenment and Industrial Revolution, Audubon's prints, Clarke's and Dick's science fiction, Kraftwerk's music. The digital age has seen the intimate linking of science coupled with visual, aural and musical exposition. The generosity of Young Harvill (B.A., Evergreen 1976; M.F.A., Stanford 1985) makes possible an annual award of $5,000 to explore the intersections of art and science through the visual arts, literature, multimedia, dance, theater and any other compelling media including those emerging from the hard sciences.The award is in memory of Young's father. Tom Rye Harvill was born in Centerville, Tennessee in 1915. His family left Tennessee when his mother died in childbirth; he was 4. He lived on his Grandfather's farm in Madison County, Mississippi until he was 6. His father, Grover Harvill, moved the family to Newellton, Louisiana, where Tom spent most of his boyhood.Tom developed an interest in electronics, radio, astronomy, and poetry. After attending law school at LSU for a couple of years, he returned home to help his family in the depression years. He enlisted in the armed services at the start of World War II and served with the Signal Corps in the Philippines. After the war, while still in the Signal Corps, he worked on early prototypes of mobile radio teletypes.He moved to Salt Lake City after the war to take a job at Packard Motor Company. He met and married Lorna Young in 1950. He continued his interest in radio by tinkering with ham radio.In 1957, after continued study in electronics, Tom joined Univac, a company developing the first commercial computer. He was a field engineer and computer operator.He joined General Electric's computing group in 1961, working as an electronics engineer and as a technical writer. He also wrote poetry.Tom read a lot, did a lot, and was a great at synthesizing big concepts from detail. He used this in his poetry, and in day-to-day conversation. He was great to talk with because he was always engaged and interested in some new connection, some new way of looking at the world.Tom Harvill died in 1997.

Click here for a listing of past Harvill award recipients

Click here for application instructions and deadlines

 

the project | tom rye harvill | faculty & staff | gallery